Uncategorized

Gender Offenders

November 22, 2017

Share

The Media Meltdown of 2017 in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein disclosures is, to say the least, ironic. Why has the feminism-promoting media industry turned out to be the worst offender in abusing young women?

For example, PBS star Charlie Rose was taken down on Monday for decades of unmitigated horndoggery around his bevy of lovely young lady producers, known in the business as Charlie’s Angels.

Also on Monday The New York Times’ anti-Trump White House correspondent Glenn Thrush was suspended.

And by the time you read this, there will likely be others.

Now, it’s almost certain that some largely innocent men will be swept up in the mounting hysteria. After all, the definition of sexual harassment as “unwanted sexual advances” is a logical morass. As I pointed out in 1992 when forecasting that the incoming Clinton administration would be rocked by a sexual-harassment scandal:

What self-respecting woman would admit that no man had ever made an unwanted sexual advance toward her? She’d be admitting either that no man’s ever made her a sexual advance or that she’s never met a sexual advance she didn’t like.

On the other hand, most of the guys who have taken a fall so far, such as movie moguls Harvey Weinstein and Brett Ratner, have been notorious jerks.

“Careers where women are most abundant and most ambitious, such as television and movies, are where they are most exploited.”

After all, the fellows shamed so far are largely not random Republicans, as they were supposed to be. Instead, they are primarily Democratic Party made men. For example, Ratner, who got his start in showbiz procuring white girls for rap mogul Russell Simmons, hosted a 2007 fund-raiser attended by Hillary at his infamous Hilhaven swinging bachelor pad.

Granted, one reason the media have ended up exposing themselves is because their stories tend to be more interesting. In contrast, there is currently a sizable sex-abuse scandal going on at the leftist Service Employees International Union, which represents janitors and hotel maids.

You might not have heard about it yet, in part because the SEIU is a stalwart of the Democratic Party and its plan to rig American elections by importing millions of foreign ringers. For years, SEIU’s largely Jewish leadership has been selling out the economic interests of its largely Hispanic members by demanding more immigration to create more Democratic voters.

But another reason that the SEIU scandal story isn’t as sexy as the media scandals is that janitors, maids, and union staffers are unglamorous and kind of depressing. Who wants to read about them?

For years the press has been telling us that industries that hire mostly men—such as computer programming, defense, and the military—must be bad for women. No doubt, it is explained, all those horrible, evil male engineers must be teaming up to exploit the handful of female employees. After all, men and women are enemy genders. I mean, that’s what every lesbian women’s-studies professor says, and they wouldn’t have any incentive to lie, would they?

Therefore, women must be given much more in the way of affirmative-action quotas in technology companies. Similarly, the Obama administration went to war against the armed services over the purported “epidemic of rape in the military” that turned out to be only slightly more real than Haven Monahan’s fraternity-house gang rape on broken glass.

Instead, however, we see that careers where women are most abundant and most ambitious, such as television and movies, are where they are most exploited.

Why? It’s simple supply and demand.

Conversely, just as women got the vote way back in 1870 in the frontier states of Wyoming and Utah because cowboys wanted to encourage schoolmarms to migrate, women tend to be treated rather well by lonely male employees in industries where they are rare.

For example, secretaries at midcentury Lockheed Aircraft, such as my mother and her friends, tended to do quite well for themselves in acquiring husbands. After my mother was widowed when her Marine first husband was killed in combat on Iwo Jima in early 1945, she found my engineer father. They were married from 1946 until her death in 1998.

My father wasn’t a genius engineer. His career was spent figuring out how to keep the more brilliant designers’ envelope-pushing airplanes, such as the F-104, from crashing. And he was socially awkward. But he was a good man.

Subscribe to Taki’s Magazine for an ad-free experience and help us stand against political correctness.